Why Can Everyone Spot Fake News But The Tech Companies?

From Daring Fireballs John Gruber:

It’s the same reason why Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are overrun with state-backed troll accounts from Russia. Engagement leads to growth, growth is all that matters, and if the trolls and fake news are engaging, better not to look for them. The oft-quoted Upton Sinclair quote fits perfectly: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

Source: Why Can Everyone Spot Fake News But The Tech Companies?

Author Societies – Transfer of value explained in new GESAC brochure

Please read this short brochure to get a quick and concise overview of the current exploitative practice in the online marketplace.

Created in 1990, Gesac represents more that 1 million rights holders in the areas of music, graphic and plastic arts, literary and dramatic works, and audiovisual as well as music publishers.

Source: Author Societies – Transfer of value explained in new GESAC brochure

Sadness. Squared. And then some. #outrageous – Spotify’s investment striptease is an ugly necessity – but an insult to artists – Music Business Worldwide

Yes, Daniel Ek is a smart guy, getting very rich and I know there is a culture out there commending this.

I find it sad that it’s don on the back of the people who helped shaped almost everyones personalities in their formative years.

And yet, we’re talking about a day this year when new investors in Spotify will earn more than $100m, pretty much guaranteed, for doing nothing more than answering Daniel Ek’s call.
We’re also talking about a day where the major labels, who’ve taken somewhere between 15% and 20% in Spotify, get a ginormous one-hit windfall that looks almost impossible to attribute or audit to individual artists.

Source: Spotify’s investment striptease is an ugly necessity – but an insult to artists – Music Business Worldwide

Steve jobs on intellectual property, copyright and stealing

“From the earliest days of Apple I realized that we thrived when we created intellectual property. If people copied or stole our software we’d be out of business. If it weren’t protected there’d be no incentive for us to make new software or product designs. If protection of intellectual property begins to disappear creative companies will disappear or never get started. But there’s a simpler reason: it’s wrong to steal. It hurts other people, and it hurts your own character.”

Source: Steven Soderbergh – The State of Cinema Video & Transcript — SF Film Society Blog

Weekend reading: The Fake Traffic Schemes That Are Rotting the Internet

For anyone doing business on the internet, the article below is essential reading.

This paragraph made me chuckle:

In September, after Bloomberg Businessweek asked Viant about its content, Myspace players began showing non-placeholder videos. But if the counters embedded in the players are accurate, those placeholders are some of the most watched clips in Internet history. Hitboy has amassed 690 million views. Even bigger is Surfing, which looks like someone butt-dialed a video: five seconds of black screen with some muffled background noise. According to the Myspace counter, Surfing has been viewed 1.5 billion times. That would make it bigger than any YouTube video in history—with the exception of Gangnam Style.

So, basically what the music industry has been saying for _years_ is, that music and music videos are one of the biggest drivers of traffic on the internet. Yet, the music isn’t generating any revenue to speak of anymore.

I personally suspect, that a lot of the “free culture” and “free information” and “creative common” folks around the web are either cleverly programmed AIs or (more likely) the cheap labor workforce  reposting standard thoughts and arguments in order to keep their employers properties relevant.

 

An exclusive investigation into the bots that will cost companies over $6 billion this year

Source: The Fake Traffic Schemes That Are Rotting the Internet

 

Enabling of Ad Blocking in Apple’s iOS 9 Prompts Backlash – The New York Times

There is a small revolution going on at the moment. The very successful and great content creators of the internet start to understand how their business model actually works.

These are the same people who have turned a blind eye for years at the issues surrounding music and the monetizing of music.

They kept saying: look for a new business model, look for a new business model, look for a new business model, look for a new…

I don’t mind them and their content going away. Even if it’s the New York Times.

What I like to see come back is a business model between creators and end users based on open and transparent transactions: I use your content, I pay you directly for it. Either up front and can keep the content or transparently per use.

But the new middle men are much much worse than the old labels used to be.

Apps that block all ads are threatening some web publishers’ livelihoods, which in turn could threaten some content on the web.

Source: Enabling of Ad Blocking in Apple’s iOS 9 Prompts Backlash – The New York Times